What Shall We Wear?

October 15, 2017

What Shall We Wear?

Matthew 22:1-14

“Therefore go to the roads on the edge of town and invite everyone you find to the wedding party. Then those servants went to the roads and gathered everyone they found, both evil and good. The wedding party of full of guests?

The Gospel calls us to proclaim that God’s door is always open and all are welcome regardless of who they are. We are not to judge, but to carry the message of inclusive love to the streets.

My friend Kevin, in the photo, is a senior in high school in Marin. Yesterday we worked our  booth at “Our Town” in SF”, in the Castro. This photo says it all to me, it tells me of a person who is open, and caring, of everyone. On the surface,  he is a foot ball player, a swimmer, a typical Marin teen, but beneath that image is one who cares for people.

The same with my friend Matt, who goes to the same high school.  I have told Matthew that I feel “safe” around him, and he loves joking with me about it.. It has nothing to do with physical danger, that scares me none, I am threatened all the time, I have had people try to kill me and so that is nothing–it is in my face, it is of  not feeling safe emotionally,  being judged, and not able to be  myself, that scares me.To Matt I am just his friend.  I am simply River. That is the greatest gift we can give one another, that is a gift we can not give by staying on the computer or by not taking time to listen. I have been fighting depression for weeks– two deaths on the street, working with an older woman in a facility without family, young guys desperate, in pain and other reasons, and Matt has simply been their, accepting me for me. He heard me pray for a couple on the phone, and he joked, “Oh  you are a priest, now?” He does not care what I am,  he sees me for me. And yesterday I saw that in Kevin. They treat each person for who they are.

Yesterday I was buying some food for a homeless young person at the Walgreen’s in the Castro, and the store personal asked him to leave with the words: “We do not want a dirty homeless person in here,” and there were no homeless people around our event. If Kevin had not been with me I would have felt uncomfortable.

Our boundaries of race, age, religion, you name it, separates us from human beings.  I refuse, absolutely, refuse to seek to convert a person to my religious belief or way of life. My friend Jesus calls us to love one another, and in so doing to love God as we see or do not see God, and that love means to give of all that we have, and of ourselves until all are fed, clothed, and housed. In our giving to the other our hearts are changed, and thus our lives.You see judgment, and trying to impose our beliefs on another are simply ways of keeping us separated from the other, rather than involvement.

When I was twenty-two, the year I was ordained, I was driving home from an event with my  younger brother. It was on a country road, dark  wet, and we had a accident, he was killed.  My life was changed forever, a therapist I was seeing told me: “You are at a cross roads, you can  choose to take the road of becoming an old, set in his ways   minister, or you can ride motorcycles–using this experience to move free, to be yourself, and to see life in all of its reality of pain, suffering and joy. You can leave the boundaries, be free, and serve. Your choice, life or death.”

I chose to “ride the motorcycle” and that ride has brought me to the realization that to sit in judgment, to stay within our many tribes that bind us destroys us, and life. But to open our lives to each other and walk with each other as brother and sister, giving to each other of what we have–=is life giving. Life is difficult, but once you accept that it is damn well worth the journey.

Don’t ask what you can wear–but how you can care! Embrace life!

Creator Spiritus! Come Creator Spirit!

Fr. River Damien Sims, sfw, D.Min., D.S.T.

P.O. Box 642656

San Francisco, CA 94164

http://www.temenos.org

415-305-2124

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Dysphoria

October 13, 2017

 

Dysphoria

Luke 11:15-26

There was article in the Chronicle in which a person described San Francisco as becoming a dysphoria, a place where there is a great division between rich and poor and  no middle class, and where people do not care for each other–they simply take care of themselves and their tribes. It is a deadly, boring, soul killing environment.

Last night a friend texted asking if it was appropriate for him to call me; when I was in the hospital a year ago, a clergy person texted me saying that was the way he was doing visitation to “save money and time.” I told my friend to call me any time, day or night, and my clergy friend is no longer a friend.  When we lose personal touch, when we are afraid to open ourselves to others, when we are too damn busy to talk to someone or to see them–than we are failing to bring the Kingdom of God into reality.

The Kingdom of God is now. The cross is both  perpendicular and diagonal.  Unless we care for each other, take care of each, other our relationship with God simply is dead. The reign of God is now–not in some distant future nor after death, it is now!

I was in Santa Rosa two days ago being present to people in a shelter, it was sobering, it was painful; I came home to two tents in front of my door. And it is sobering and painful–we all hurt, we all suffer, in one form or another. We suffer less, and we help others suffer less when we reach out and touch the lives of others.

Frankly there are days when I wonder why keep on living, why go on. I have thought of ways to end my life. There are days I think “Why keep on going?” It is painful, to see so much pain, to be so disconnected, and see that people do not give a damn. I sometimes simply take it one minute at at time. We have become so disconnected, we text, we email, but we never talk; we say the most horrible things on Facebook to each other, spreading gossip and rumors, and tearing down people for what they believe. Each day I wonder when someone is going to spread something about me.  There are no boundaries.  So why live in such a world, why live where you never feel safe, never feel connected? I hear that day in and day out from kids on the street, from homeless adults, from people who have money, and I feel the same way.

I have a friend who is a Senior in high school, and he invites me out to his house. We sit in his room, and watch T.V., and talk. Some times I say very little, and he wonders if I am having fun, and the truth is I feel so connected, like I belong, like I do not have to give anything. It is my most enjoyable time of the week.  I was out at his house last night, I was quiet, my day in Santa Rosa frankly was painful, and draining, and he asked me if  I was having fun. Matthew has no idea how much those three hours meant to me, the greatest gift any one can give is themselves. Matt is willing to put up with me, as we all should be willing to be put with another.

That is friendship, that is what we are called to be with each other. 

Henri Nouwen struggled all of his life, with deep depression and feeling alone, and he summarizes what is needed in our time:

“Compassion means to become

close to the one who suffers. But we can come close to another person

only when we are willing to become vulnerable ourselves.

A compassionate person says:

“I am your brother; I am your sister;

I am human, fragile, and mortal, just like you.

I am not scandalized by our tears,

nor afraid of your pain.

I too have wept, I too have felt pain.”

We can be with the other

only when the other ceases to be “other” and becomes like us.”

Fr. River Damien Sims, sfw, D.Min., D.S.T.

P.O. Box 642656

San Francisco, CA 94164

http://www.temenos.org

415-305-2124

punkpriest1@gmail.com

 

Out of the Depths A Book Review

October 10, 2017

OUT OF THE DEPTHS BY KENNETH E. KOVACS–A BOOK REVIEW

Kovacs’ book confronts  the institutional church with a faith based on creeds, and steers people away from personal experience.  His book calls us to enter into a relationship of experience, a lived out relationship with Jesus of Nazareth.

A faith based on creeds, on “rational” belief, leads us to become an institution within itself. We live within our own “tribes”, seeing those outside as the “other”.  Kovacs calls us to entering into a lived relationship with Christ and becoming one with our fellow human beings.

For along time I have been uncomfortable within a church building and its worship services. I feel like an “alien”.  I no longer accept preaching engagements, because of being uncomfortable. I feel like Carl Jung, “Church was a place to which I no longer could go. There was no life there, but death.” 

Penny Lernoux, a journalist, once wrote: “you can look at a slum or peasant village, but it is only by entering into that world–by living in it–that you begin to understand what it is like to be powerless, to be like Christ.” This is found in a personal relationship with Jesus of Nazareth.

Life is found in a faith that is personal, one that makes us uncomfortable.  It is in being uncomfortable that we grow, we learn to relate to God, as our friend. 

A poem by Derek Walcott tells us that we must look ourselves in the face, and in so doing, we find God, and from there we move out in caring for our brothers and sisters, without the boundaries of race, creed, socioeconomic status.,  which is the message of Kovacs book:

Love After Love

The day will come

the time will come

when with elation

you will greet yourself

arriving at your own door

and each will smile at each other’s welcome

saying sit here, eat

you will love again the stranger who was yourself

Give wine, give bread

give back your heart to yourself

to the stranger who has loved you all your life

who you ignored for another

who know you by heart

Take down the love letters from the bookshelf,

the photographs, the desperate notes

feel your own image in the mirror, see it

Feast on your life.

Creator Spirtus, Come Creator Spirit!

Fr. River Damien Sims, sfw, D.Min., D.S.T.

P.O. Box 642656

San Francisco, CA 94164

http://www.temenos.org

415-305-2124

punkpriest1@gmail.com

franciscansagainstdeathpenalty@gmail.com

 

When the Going Gets Tough!

October 7, 2017

(Shaggy)

When the Going Is Tough As Hell!

Ephesians 6:13

“Therefore pick up the full armor of God so that you can stand your ground on the evil day and after you have done everything possible to still stand.”

Last night at 7:00 p.m. I received a phone call from a person asking me to speak at a conference at the end of the month. I had turned him down. He offered me more money and again I told him that it was on the day of the last foot ball game a friend  was playing in his high school career. He said, “Come on, who would turn down money for a kid’s foot ball game, he want  care whether you are there are not.” I responded, “But I care that I am there and he is not just a kid, he is my friend”, and he pushed me again and my response is unrepeatable. The man than writes me an email telling me how “immature” I am in my choices. I am certainly told that a lot, nothing new. Well, as the southern lady says, “How nice!”

And then around 12:30 seventeen year old Shane shows up at my door, telling me he wants to kill himself. So for three hours I listen–he feels alone, no one cares, no one wants to let him be who he is etc.  Shane suddenly looks at me and says very perceptively, “You feel the same way sometimes don’t you,” and I said, “Hell yea!” (I feel that way now).  I told him three things keeps me hanging on–my faith in Christ, moments like this walking with someone on their journey, and my pure stubbornness never to give any one the satisfaction of seeing me give up. He now sleeps on my top bunk, like a baby, and I have been throwing up for hours.

Right now I am exhausted, crying my eyes out, and frankly want to give up and say to hell with it all, who gives a damn, but what I will do is “still stand.” That is my witness–never give up, and  “still stand,” in season, and out of season. 

Veni Creator Spiritus, Come, Creator Spirit.”

Temenos Anniversary Reception

St. Luke’s Episcopal Church

1755 Clay Street

San Francisco, CA

11:30 a.m.

(Worship is at 10:00 a.m. Rev. Stacey Gross, preaching)

Fr. River Damien Sims, sfw, D.Min. D.S.T.

P.O. Box 642656

San Francisco, CA 94164

415-305-2124

http://www.temenos.org

Temenos Catholic Worker

Love After Love

October 6, 2017

 

Love After Love

The day will come

the time will come

when with elation

you will greet yourself

arriving at your own door

and each will smile at each other’s welcome

saying sit here, eat

you will love again the stranger who was yourself

Give wine, give bread

give back your heart to yourself

to the stranger who has loved you all your life

who you ignored for another

who knows you by heart

Take down the love letters from the bookshelf,

the photographs, the desperate notes

feel your own image in the mirror, see it

Feast on your life.

Derek Walcott

Another year has past! This month is the  anniversary of our  coming to San Francisco! I came with the ambition of building an agency, becoming known, simply because I could not face myself. I have two doctorates, two master’s degrees–all to build up my own image, to gain acceptance, to be “liked”.

But in these years I have come face to face with myself. In each young person I face I see myself, in each person whose hand I hold, I see myself, in each person I see overcome with drug abuse, depression, and broken, I see myself. In each person I bury I see myself. That is why in hanging out with these guys, in working with them, I am one with them.  Recently, someone asked 16 year old Stacey, on the Haight,”Who is that guy?” , and his reply–“Oh he is one of us,” not the priest, but “one of us”. 

In looking  myself in the face, the words of Carl Jung ring true:

“That I feed the hungry, that I forgive an insult, that I love my enemy in the name of Christ–all these are undoubtedly great virtues.  What I do unto the least of my brethren, that I do unto Christ.  But what if I should discover that the least among them all, the poorest of all beggars, the most impudent of all the offenders, the very enemy himself–that these are within me, and that I myself stand in need of the alms of my own kindness–that I myself am the enemy who must be loved–what then?”

What then? For me I can not sit in judgment, but simply love the other as myself. And loving myself is not easy, for to love myself, I face my own limitations each day. I am broken, I am a failure in many ways, and  in acknowledging that I come to love myself and in doing so am able to love others more fully.

  These are hard words, for it means facing our own limitations, and embracing the other.

We are hosting a Reception

At St. Luke’s Episcopal Church

1755 Clay Street

San Francisco, CA 94109

Sunday, October 8, 2017

In Thanksgiving

For Our Ministry in San Francisco, CA

11:30 a.m. ( worship is at 10:00 a.m.)

Veni Creator Spiritus. Come Creator Spirit.

Fr. River Damien Sims, sfw, D.Min., D.S.T.

Temenos Catholic Worker, Franciscans Against the Death Penalty

P.O. Box 642656

San Francisco, CA 94164

http://www.temenos.org

415-305-2124

 

Keep Your Hand to the Plow

October 4, 2017

Keep Plowing

The Feast of St. Francis

Tenth Anniversary of Episcopal Consecration

Luke 9:57-62

“Jesus said: “No one who puts a hand on the plow and looks back is fit for God’s kingdom.”

I remember one of my child hood nannies, an old black woman, named Lucy, telling me when I accepted my first church–“Keep your hand on the plow.” I have found that only by keeping my hand on the plow and moving forward in the midst of controversy, hatred, and doubt, can you see the face of Jesus.

Ten years ago today I was consecrated a Bishop in the Old Catholic movement primarily because frankly I am feral, I do not fit in, I am wild in many ways, like my kids, I know how to play the game, to a certain extent.  I am told I don’t listen, but the reality is I listen intently, and follow what my instinct, tells me to do. 

And so  on this Feast of St. Francis what is “success” in ministry for me. 

First of all success is my dedication, and through that dedication I see Nathan, who is 40, whose drug use keeps him from getting a job, who comes for food and to talk; I see Jason, who is 16, and has been emotionally abused through his religion over being gay; I see Sue, 19, who ran away from home because her parents tried to get her to stop using drugs, and the list goes on and on. My success stories are simply being present, listening, and letting the Spirit move in their lives.

Pain, and hurt comes, but so does much joy from  being who we are as we listen to that still small voice within.

The two phrases on my tattoo says it all for me: “No regrets”–there are no regrets; and we find God in all things, nothing does not have God, he is in all of life. So we should not judge. But listen, and be aware God comes in unexpected places. Last Saturday God  came to me in my 17 year old volunteer at the Veg Fest. Kevin showed more love and care for people in those hours, than I see most days. We all have to find the meaning to our existence on our own, but we can walk with one another, and in that walking find strength. My goal is to give my kids strength for their journey, strength to lift their heads high, and say “I am all right!”, regardless of what people  say, of what they  wear, of what they  do. If in these years I have given one person strength –strength for the journey, I am happy, if I have not than I can say loud and clear “I have tried”, and that is all we are ask to do is to try.

Thomas Merton gives a good summary on how we should live our lives, and find much joy:

‘In the last analysis, the individual person is responsible for living his (her) own life and for ”finding himself.” If he persists in shifting his responsibility to somebody else, he fails to find out the meaning of his own existence.”
– Thomas Merton Deo Gratias! Thanks be to God!

Planet First! Season of Creation! Rally

Noon

Earl Warren Supreme Court Building

350 McAllister Street

San Francisco, CA

Bring a Sack lunch to Share with A Homeless Person

Come and Celebrate Creation

+Fr. River Damien Sims,sfw, D.Min., D.S.T

P.O. Box 642656

San Francisco, CA 94164

http://www.temenos.org

415-305-2124

 

Season of Creation

October 4, 2017

Planet First! The Feast of St. Francis, October 4, 2017

Earl Warren Supreme Court Building

Franciscans Against the Death Penalty

Today we gather on this Feast of St. Francis to remember God’s goodness in our creation; we gather to remember that all of life is worth our respect; we gather to remember those who live on our streets, those who have died in Las Vegas, and victims of violence throughout the world.

Let pray:

A Litany for This Day

Remembering especially victims and first responders of the Las Vegas mass shooting and the victims and first responders of Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico, Hurricane Harvey, IrmaJose, Katia, and Lee, and for all who have asked for our prayers.
 
Holy God, Creator of heaven and earth,
Have mercy on us.
Holy and Mighty, Redeemer of our humanity,
Have mercy on us.
Holy Immortal One, Sanctifier of the world,
Have mercy on us.
Holy, blessed and glorious Trinity, One God,
Have mercy on us.
 
From all evil; from pride, vanity and hypocrisy; from envy, hatred and malice; and from all evil intent,
Savior deliver us.
 
From hardness of heart and contempt for your word and your laws,
Savior deliver us.
 
From hurricane and flood, famine and disaster; from violence, murder, and dying unprepared,
Savior deliver us.
 
In all times of sorrow, in the hour of our death and at the day of judgment,
Savior deliver us.
 
By your ministry in word and work; by your mighty acts of power; by the preaching of your reign,
Savior deliver us.
 
By your agony and trial; by your cross and passion; by your precious death and burial,
Savior deliver us.
 
By your mighty resurrection; by your glorious ascension; and by your sending of the Holy Spirit,
Savior deliver us.
 
Hear our prayers, O Christ our God.
Hear us, O Christ.
 
Enlighten your bishops, priests, deacons, and lay people with knowledge and understanding, that by their teaching and their lives they may proclaim your word.
Hear us, O Christ.
 
Bring into the way of truth all who have erred and are deceived.
Hear us, O Christ.
 
Strengthen those who stand; comfort and help the fainthearted; raise up the fallen; and finally beat down Satan under our feet.
Hear us, O Christ.
 
Give your wisdom and strength to the President of the United States, the Members of Congress and especially the Resident Commissioner of Puerto Rico, the Governors of Nevada and Puerto Rico and the mayors of San Juan and Las Vegas, and all others in authority, that by your grace they may do justice, and love mercy, and walk in the ways of truth.
Hear us, O Christ.
 
Bless the justices of the Supreme Court as they begin their new term, and all those who administer the law, that they may act with integrity and do justice for all your people.
Hear us, O Christ.
 
Comfort and liberate the fearful, the bereaved, and especially those who do not know the condition of their loved ones.
Hear us, O Christ.
 
Keep in safety those who travel, and especially first responders who are helping or going to help in Puerto Rico and in Las Vegas and all who are in peril.
Hear us, O Christ.
 
Guard and protect all children who are in danger.
Hear us, O Christ.
 
Forgive our enemies, persecutors and slanderers, and turn their hearts.
Hear us, O Christ.
 
Hear us as we remember those who have died in Puerto Rico and in Las Vegas and those who will die today, and grant us with them a share in your eternal glory.
Hear us, O Christ.

Give us true repentance; forgive us our sins of negligence and ignorance and our deliberate sins; and grant us the grace of your Holy Spirit to amend our lives according to your word.
Hear us, O Christ.
 
By your relentlessly creative love, work your will in us to heal the breach and restore the streets to live in.
Hear us, O Christ.
 
Grant us courage of heart, strength of mind, and stamina of spirit to be your instruments for the healing of your world.
 
Holy God,
Holy and Mighty,
Holy Immortal One,
Have mercy on us.
 
 
 by the Rev. Molly Haws and the Rev. Stacey Grossman, Episcopal Diocese of California.

In Silence Let Us Stand In Protest against All Violence and Against the Death Penalty

Today all around us there are people without housing, and food, and as we pray the Prayer of St. Francis I invite you to move out and talk to someone on the street, to give them a bag lunch or one of the candy bars we have here.  Let us see them as we all are, the broken body of Christ, and reach out and simply be present with someone. Let us pray:

Lord, make me an instrument of your peace. Where there is hatred, let me sow love; where there is injury, pardon; where there is doubt, faith; where there is despair, hope; where there is darkness, light; and where there is sadness, joy. O Divine Master, grant that I may not so much seek to be consoled as to console; to be understood as to understand; to be loved as to love. For it is in giving that we receive; it is in pardoning that we are pardoned; and it is in dying that we are born to eternal life. Amen.

Go in peace! Go Serve!

 

The Feast of St. Francis: Planet First

October 3, 2017

The Feast of St. Francis-Planet First!

Luke 9:57-62

Planet First: Care Rests Upon Genuine Religion

Celebrate the One Seamless Thread of Life

One God: In Many Faces

Wednesday, October 4, 2017

Noon

Earl Warren Supreme Court Building

350 McAllister Street

San Francisco, CA

Symbolic Action is That of Being the Power of One: Bring a bag lunch, as a part of our celebration we will move on to the streets, and find one homeless person and engage with them and share our food.

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As we celebrate the Feast of St. Francis, let us look around us, and we will see that the poverty is flourishing. 

The photo is one taken this morning outside my door on Polk Street. People are suffering all around us. You asked “What can I do?” and the answer to that question is: do not walk by, but talk to people, feed them, be the power of one.

Gandhi tells us how we can truly find ourselves: “The best way to find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others.” 

I have found that the best way to deal with my fears, and there are many, is to lose myself in caring for others.  Sit down with someone, and your fears, your worries, your pain lessens. On this Feast of St. Francis let us remember the man who loved everyone. Let us stop passing by the tents, and the homeless on our street, without saying a word, without giving them food, but let us meet them face to face and see in them the broken body of Jesus. Deo Gratias! Thanks be to God!

“When we gather around the table and eat from the same loaf and drink from the same cup, we are most vulnerable to one another. We cannot have a meal together in peace with guns hanging over our shoulders and pistols attached to our belts. When we break bread together we leave our arms – whether they are physical or mental – at the door and enter into a place of mutual vulnerability and trust.
The beauty of the Eucharist is precisely that it is the place where a vulnerable God invites vulnerable people to come together in a peaceful meal. When we break bread and give it to each other, fear vanishes and God becomes very close.” Henri Nouwen

+Fr. River Damien Sims, sfw, D.S.T., D.Min.

P.O. Box 642656

San Francisco, CA

http://www.temenos. org

415-305-2124

Peniel–23rd Anniversary Issue

September 30, 2017

 

 

PENIEL-TEMENOS CATHOLIC WORKER–October, 2017–23rd. Anniversary

Journal of An Alien Street Priest

I have watched a TV series entitled “Salvation.”  It was about an asteroid headed for earth and the efforts of several people to build a missile to destroy it. Rather than a world coming together, we have a dark portrayal of selfishness and use of the project by our government to destroy a block of countries that are our enemies. All seems dark, all seems hopeless, but three people represent the light of salvation and there is hope.

Homelessness is rising, tents are in our alleys, college professors are sleeping in their cars, violence is rampant, nothing seems to change but grows worse.  And yet in these 23 years there is the hope of salvation that shines through. Salvation is offered in the small signs we experience, and do each day.

Salvation breaks through in the face of Shaggy, who comes to our door, always high and drunk at all hours of the day and night, asking for a pair of socks. Behind that facade is the lonely, needy person who wants a word of care; in the face of Ira, 19, who is struggling with being transgender and uses drugs to compensate for his pain. The light in his eyes brighten as we kneel down and give him some socks, food, and care; Salvation is present in Cindy, fifty, who has been homeless for thirty years. She has been raped, abused, has prostituted, uses drugs, and sits alone most of the time, but smiles a bright smile when we spend time with her.

Salvation breaks through in the volunteers and donors who have supported our ministry. Through their care and money for 23 years they have provided “a cup of cold water” to thousands. Each meal we serve, each hand we hold, each pair of socks we give shouts that Christ is present, and that salvation is at hand;  Salvation breaks through to me personally in the love and  care you have given me. Through your gifts, your words, your care, you have given me hope. I have been called a child, immature, and many worst names, and yet you have believed in our work, you have uplifted us, for you know that in our imperfections we offer a glimpse of salvation through you in the name of Christ.

Salvation is near! And, as in the coming years as Temenos passes one, salvation will continue to be near, in the proclamation of the Gospel, for salvation is a continuing process, and one that will eventually embrace the world, but for now salvation is near!

Francis De Sales said: “You learn to speak by speaking, to study by studying, to run by running, to work by working, and, just so, you learn to love by loving. All those who think to learn in any other way deceive themselves.”

We are still learning to love.  And in learning to love we are like the Velveteen Rabbit: “Wasn’t I Real before? asked the little Rabbit. “You were Real to the Boy,” the Fairy said, “because he loved you. Now you shall be Real to everyone.”

Salvation comes in loving, in giving ourselves away, for in loving we die, and we experience resurrection. And so we continue the journey, and as we journey together in the journey of salvation we give you our heartfelt thanks. Deo Gratias! Thanks be to God!

World Vegetarian Festival

In Cooperation with the Christian Vegetarian Association

October 1, 2017–10:00 a.m;–6:00 p.m.

San Francisco County Fair Building

1199 9th Avenue

San Francisco, CA 94122

The first World Veg Festival in San Francisco happened in 1988 and has run annually ever since. It was initially launched to celebrate World Vegetarian Day, observed worldwide on October 1st.

WVF brings together vegetarians and vegans, as well as curious non-vegetarians and flexitarians, to celebrate World Veg Day, featuring plant-based nutrition experts, dynamic speakers, cooking demos, great veg products that the whole family can enjoy.

Temenos Catholic Worker and the Christian Vegetarian Association will be sponsoring a joint booth. Volunteers are Needed! Please contact Fr. River at punkpriest1@gmail.com or 415-305-2124 if you would like to volunteer. Get in free if you volunteer!

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Planet First: Care Rests Upon Genuine Religion

Celebrate the One Seamless Thread of Life

One God: In many Faces

Wednesday, October 4, 2017

Noon

Earl Warren Supreme Court Building

350 McAllister Street, San Francisco, CA

Symbolic Action is That of Being the Power of One: Bring one bag lunch, as a part of our celebration we will move on to the streets, and find one homeless person and engage with them and share the food with them. 

Inline image 1
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WEEKLY MEALS

We generally serve two hot meals a week, one on Polk and one on Haight. We served for many years at two needle exchange sites, but each of our schedules, and changes in the demographics of the population have necessitated we no longer do that.

So our meal schedule is usually in the early afternoon.  If you would like help, hang out with us, simply contact us, and we can let you know our schedule for the week.

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WE ARE BEGGARS

As we enter the Fall of the year, our needs have been met, barely.  We have given away 50 plus thousand pairs of socks, our costs for food, tickets home, etc., have risen 50 percent.  I am always saying “no” more than I say “yes.”

The heart of what we do is our pastoral ministry.  It is sitting and listening as one young man talks of how he feels so low, because he is homeless, and every thing he tries fails; one talks of how the city continually kicks him out of his sleeping place, throwing away his belongs, and of his feelings of fear and mistrust; another talks of his sexual abuse; one young girl talks of her fears and her sexual abuse, and so on.

We walk with hundreds each month. With some we celebrate the Sacraments, but mostly we listen, and the bread of life is broken in the words spoken.

So we beg on our knees for your gifts, that they may be turned into the Word made flesh in the lives of our homeless young people.

Checks to:

Temenos Catholic Worker

P.O. Box 642656

San Francisco, CA 94164

Or

PayPal: www.temenos.org

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Fuc7 You

September 30, 2017

FU7K THE SYSTEM

The painting above was given to me by an 18 year old in the Haight, it is the way he views the system as being hostile to people who are different.

Tonight I sat in a the US 101 Bar on Van Ness, and had a memorial service for Michael, 39, whom I have known since he was 19. He was found slumped over dead in a bus stop. Michael has been homeless for as long as I have known him. He hustled, and used drugs, and as he became older struggled with aging, seeing his life get narrower, and not being the “cute boy” he once was.

I sat up a meeting for next week with a social worker to talk to a 78 year old woman, who has lived on Polk for 40 years, she would sweep the street to give back to the neighborhood. She had a stroke, laid on her apartment floor for 9 days, and will not be able to return to her apartment. I have to work with them on helping her let go of coming home. It will be a rough day, and a rough time for Opal.

A mother brought her 12 year old son to see me today. They are homeless, and he needs some shoes, so I am buying him shoes.  And so it goes.  I too, like my friend, am  angry with the system.  But ultimately, I have to put that anger aside, for it will consume one, and simply remember these words:

“in the new light

of each day’s questions,

I am never prepared.

Today, again, I have nothing

to offer but a handful

of old prayers, worn down

by the relentless abrasion

of doubt, and a fragment

of dream that plays on in my head

only half remembered. Still,

the doves coo and circle

through the pines

as they do when I pass

each morning. Their sorrow

is so nearly human, it rings

sweet with regret. By dusk,

the trees will bow down, and I too, will

make my appeal, will find

again your mercy,

your solace.” Elizabeth Drescher

Fr. River Damien Sims, D.Min. D.S.T.

P.O. Box 642656

San Francisco, CA 94164

415-305-2124

http://www.temenos.org

415-305-2124