Archive for the ‘religion’ Category

Be Merciful!

March 18, 2019

week-of-prayer

 

“Be Merciful, Even As Your Father Is Merciful!”

Luke 6:36-38 English Standard Version (ESV)

3Be merciful, even as your Father is merciful.

Judging Others

37 “Judge not, and you will not be judged; condemn not, and you will not be condemned; forgive, and you will be forgiven; 38 give, and it will be given to you. Good measure, pressed down, shaken together, running over, will be put into your lap. For with the measure you use it will be measured back to you.”

Last night on Madam Secretary, Henry McCord (Tim Daly) was asked to address a conservative religious group and he was asked, how he could, being the liberal that he is. His reply, “Religion can be a unifying force.”

Our Scripture today summarizes that unifying force that is found in all of the great religions. When we put all of our bull shit behind us, and stand under that unifying force, the world is transformed. God entered in Christ in our human lives (God entered in other faces as well), and suffered at the hands of humanity. Jesus holds the hope, even as we continue our mess destruction of ourselves, for “religion is a unifying force” in mercy.

Brother James Koester sums it up in these words:

We can choose to forgive as we are forgiven or we can choose to bear our grudges and nurse our hurts.  We can choose to offer and embrace and receive that peace or turn our backs. We can choose to rach out and touch God who in bread and wine is made near and real and present or we can choose to go hungry.”

————————————————————————–

WALKING STATION 4. Baptism.

“How have I undergone vision quests or similar breakthroughs that have revealed my deep calling and purpose for being on this earth at this special time? How do I develop my courage to fulfill my calling?  How have I been empowered with gifts I have cultivated in order to be true to my vocation and recognize it’s deeper meaning, even when its outer form may undergo change?”

“O Spirit. Grace me and others with the courage and generosity to respond fully to my calling and see my work and relationships in light of that vocation. Grant me flexibility and creativity also to adjust that calling as the times dictate and as the needs of my culture require.” Teach me to give my generosity of time, and finances to those who sleep on our streets. Amen. Deo Gratias! Thanks be to God!

Father River Damien Sims, sfw, D.Min., D.S.T.

P.O. Box 642656

San Francisco, CA 94164

http://www.temenos.org

The Arduous But Not Impossible Journey

March 16, 2019

The Arduous But Not Impossible Journey

Luke 9:28-36; Matthew 5:43-48

The Transfiguration Story is every one’s story of our own journey into the nature we were created to explore and inhabit This is not an easy march or a quiet march, it is an arduous but not impossible journey, and it is a journey of everlasting questions. The Transfiguration is a journey into being a forgiving person, and there are always endless questions in relationships.

Moses in Deuteronomy asks us to become “a people sacred to the Lord,” and the way to do that is offered by Jesus when he offers the prescription: “Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you.. Could anything be harder to do or offer more endless questions? Does it not take a transfiguration of our lives to love our enemies?

I come from a long line of generous, gregarious southerners. They are also an emotional and volatile people adept at holding grudges.  Grudges that last from one generation to another. My journey with the church and my journey in ministry has put me in a position where I struggle with forgiveness. The Church was abusive, people have sought to hurt me, and say horrible things about me, and  try to take advantage of me. One young guy told another one he introduced me to: “Don’t mistake his kindness for niceness.” I am not a nice person, I am tough as nails.

I have learned through the years to sit with my anger and satiate it  by looking at the cross, and visualizing the Christ in the persons I am angry at. That may go on for several days, but ultimately I see the goodness of Jesus in that person, and see his struggles, his reasons, and I have empathy for their  emotional struggle. I see the why  people try to hurt me, use me, and I can forgive them, for they are trying to find themselves, no matter how wrongly they do it. In that forgiveness one can move out, and embrace that person in love. It is not just about me, but both of us. The journey is always a dance. And the journey is always painful, always painful, but if you keep at it, you find resurrection and joy.

Secondly, I forget things really fast. In a few minutes, whatever happens  becomes nothing. In the end how important is this in the long term.  Ultimately I look back and laugh. All I see is the goodness of the relationship, and that is what matters.

Over a year ago a friend I love very much hit me and busted two of my ribs. I walked away, and than came back, and have stayed with him through his struggles. Several therapist’s have told me he violated me and I should walk away”until you do you are his victim,” I am no one’s victim, I stand on my on,  and I look at the cross of Jesus, and see he did not walk away, he stays the course. He carries his cross–and he is no one’s victim. I forget, I move on, I care.

Each night as I pray the Evening Office and pray the Lord’s Prayer, “Forgive us our debts  as as we forgive our debtors,” I name those I am angry at, praying they will forgive me, and remember Christ forgives me every day of my life and gives me a new start. I give people a new start, a new beginning. Forgiveness only comes when we forgive others.

Jesus gives us an arduous journey, but not impossible, and one with endless questions, and in following that journey our lives are transfigured into a life of love, of Jesus. Deo Gratias! Thanks be to God!

Fr. River Damien Sims, D.S.T., D.S.T.

P.O. Box 642656

San Francisco, CA 94164

http://www.temenos.org

415-305-2124

 

Atonement and the New Perspective

March 13, 2019

ATONEMENT AND THE NEW PERSPECTIVE

The God of Israel, Covenant, and the Cross

Stephen Burn Hope

Hope through a scholarly work discusses the doctrine of Atonement, how it developed and why the Jews were alienated from the process. He then brings all of it together to show the  antisemitism that resulted, and presents a unifying argument for atonement between Christian and Jews.

It is an excellent, scholarly book, but  in my preview I found that this doctrine is often used to separate us from the reign of God on the earth, and separate us from other religious expressions.

The Jesus that I have experience through out my life is one who is inclusive of everyone. He is portrayed in the Gospel of John as the One who walks to his own death leading by example and in dying communicates the Spirit to his followers, who move through out the world in his name. He is the Cosmic Christ surrounding us, nourishing us and calling us to nourish our brothers and sisters. He is but one expression in the world of the many faces of God.

This is a good book, but limits the the Gospel in its expression and targets academics. In a world suffering from war, homelessness, and poverty, it provides no hope or guidance.

Fr. River Damien Sims, sfw, D.Min., D.S.T.

P.O. Box 642656

San Francisco, CA 941674

http://www.temenos.org

Darkness

March 13, 2019

Darkness

Jonah 3:1-10;Luke 11:29-32

When my brother was killed a kind pastor said to me: “You are given a choice, you can become bitter, resentful, angry at God, or you can put your hand in the hand of God and let him be with you.  Walk in the darkness in trust, and you will come to the light.”

Through the years: when I was on the street, my son was killed, my illness with malaria put me down, and in the last year with surgery and depression, I have learned again and again what Br. Geoffrey Tristram tells us: “We cannot see the Kingdom of God just with our natural sight. We can only make that journey into God and into God’s kingdom when we actually allow ourselves to go into the darkness and put our hand into God’s hand, and take those first steps of trust.”

In the same way I enter into the darkness of people’s lives by putting my hand into God’s hand, and I trust.

The “sign of Jonah” that is embodied in Jesus is that God takes the initiative in our redemption, if we only we place our trust in him and walk with him in the darkness of life. In doing so we recreate our lives into those of compassion and peace in Christ. Deo Gratias! Thanks be to God!

Fr. River Damien Sims, D.Min., D.S.T.

punkpriest1@gmail.com

http://www.temenos.org

—————————————————————————————

WALKING STATION 3. Nativity.

“How meaningful is it that the animals and angels, shepherds and pagan wise men, stars and Jesus’ parents are all involved in the birth of the Christ—wherever it happens? As it happens in myself and in my culture, in our institutions and communities and all our relations?  How meaningful is it that Herod, the representative of the empire , also shows up?” The Nativity  comes to life in us when we open our lives to the homeless, when we take time for them, feed them, love them, and work to eliminate the lack of housing.

“O Spirit. Lead us into fuller recognition of the God-self and Cosmic Christ we behold in every creature, and especially the newborn ones, those beginning life with so much promise and eagerness. Give us the grace to parent them wisely.”

Silent Meditation

See Who You Are. Become Who You See!

 

Invitation to the Tenderloin Station of the Cosmic Christ

March 12, 2019

extending-love

Dear Colleagues and Friends,

Our Nineteenth Annual Stations of the Cross this year will be conducted through the Tenderloin on Good Friday, April 19, 2019 beginning at 12 Noon. This year we have adapted Fr. Michael Fox, and Bishop Marc Andrus, Stations of the Cosmic Christ, as our service.

We would like to invite you to participate and or attend our service.  Besides the style of the service this year we will take sandwiches with us and feed anyone who is hungry along the way, turning our prayer into action.

So if you would like to participate by reading a section of our service please let me know by April 2, 2019. Otherwise I look forward to seeing you on Good Friday. Thank you.

 

In Jesus, Street Person and Rebel,

 

Fr. River Sims, D.Min.

 

Curbside Mercy

March 11, 2019

Curbside Mercy: An 89-Year-Old’s Lenten Practice

by Maggie Lane

Matthew 25:31-46 English Standard Version (ESV)

The Final Judgment

31 “When the Son of Man comes in his glory, and all the angels with him, then he will sit on his glorious throne. 32 Before him will be gathered all the nations, and he will separate people one from another as a shepherd separates the sheep from the goats. 33 And he will place the sheep on his right, but the goats on the left. 34 Then the King will say to those on his right, ‘Come, you who are blessed by my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world. 35 For I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me drink, I was a stranger and you welcomed me, 36 I was naked and you clothed me, I was sick and you visited me, I was in prison and you came to me.’ 37 Then the righteous will answer him, saying, ‘Lord, when did we see you hungry and feed you, or thirsty and give you drink? 38 And when did we see you a stranger and welcome you, or naked and clothe you? 39 And when did we see you sick or in prison and visit you?’ 40 And the King will answer them, ‘Truly, I say to you, as you did it to one of the least of these my brothers,[a] you did it to me.’

41 “Then he will say to those on his left, ‘Depart from me, you cursed, into the eternal fire prepared for the devil and his angels. 42 For I was hungry and you gave me no food, I was thirsty and you gave me no drink, 43 I was a stranger and you did not welcome me, naked and you did not clothe me, sick and in prison and you did not visit me.’ 44 Then they also will answer, saying, ‘Lord, when did we see you hungry or thirsty or a stranger or naked or sick or in prison, and did not minister to you?’ 45 Then he will answer them, saying, ‘Truly, I say to you, as you did not do it to one of the least of these, you did not do it to me.’ 46 And these will go away into eternal punishment, but the righteous into eternal life.”



“My mother is 89 and still drives, a blessing. Her driving radius in suburban Maryland is only about five miles. She drives to Mass, to the grocery store, the library, the bank, the hairdresser, bridge games, the occasional Knights of Columbus party or neighborhood luncheon, the gas station.

Mary Hathway, 89, found a simple way to practice
Pope Francis’s call to be “islands of mercy.”

For these outings she has equipped her little Hyundai with all the necessities: a handicapped parking sticker, an umbrella, recyclable bags for the grocery store, a lawn chair for grandkids’ soccer games, a magnetic cross on her glove compartment for safe driving, and for the past two years, a single dollar bill in her cup holder.

I was thinking about that dollar bill recently when Pope Francis asked that for Lent we fast from indifference. And then again when he said in an address to the elderly, “Old age, in particular, is a time of grace, in which the Lord will renew His call: He calls us to preserve and transmit the faith, calls us to pray, especially to intercede; calls us to be close to those who may be in need.” [italics mine]

My mother’s dollar bills puts the Pope’s words in action. For the past two years she gives them to panhandlers who flash their cardboard signs and coffee cans on busy intersections.”

I have a friend who every time he dines at a restaurant  orders hash browns, which he does not eat. He orders them for the purpose of taking them out to give to a homeless individual.

I know a lady who is 92 years old, and she who donates $25.00 a month for socks, and always says, “I know you can not do much with this  but it is all that  I have,” and over the year she pays for a thousand pairs of socks.

It is the small things that we do, that adds up.  We measure our worth in our dedication to our path, not our successes or failures, our faith grows through our small actions. Deo Gratias! Thanks be to God!

Fr. River Damien Sims, sfw, D.Min.,  D.S.T.

P.O. Box 642656

San Francisco, CA 94164

http://www.temenos.org

Christ’s Temptation/Our Temptation

March 10, 2019

Christ’s Temptations are Our Temptations

Luke 4:1-13-“The devil said to him, “I shall give to you all this power and their glory; for it has been handed over to me, and I may give it to whomever I wish. All this will be yours if you worship me.

Jesus said to him in reply, “It is written: “You shall worship the Lord your God and him alone shall you serve.”

The temptations are temptations of power.  The devil tempts Jesus to use power in his ministry, and Jesus essentially replies his way is that of service. Jesus knows that only in service, in the giving our selves away as equals, can we find life, and can we give life to others.

We can expect our government, and our agencies to minister to the homeless, to the undocumented immigrants, and each time they will fail, but when we minister from the attitude of service we give of ourselves, our money, and our time, and everyone will be taken  care of and we will encounter Christ.

Dag Hammarskjold, secretary general of the United Nations, who died in a plane crash in 1961 wrote:

“I don’t know who–or what–put the question, I don’t know when it was put. I don’t even remember answering. But at some point I did answer Yes to Someone–and from that hour I was certain that existence is meaningful and that, therefore, my life in self surrender, had a goal.”

In the days  of Lent ahead of us let us center on the Stations of the Cross, and let everything else go, and walk to Calvary, remembering we care called simply to serve, to be, and success is only taking the one step at a time in loving others.

Stations 1 and 2–Walk Them, Pray Them, Listen to God!

“No longer should our brothers and sisters be seen wandering the roads and in the squares, starving and trembling with the cold, under the icy north wind, naked members of the body of Christ. There ought to be beggars and destitute persons no longer. All should be equal.”

Silent Meditation

See Who You Are. Become Who You See!

WALKING STATION 1–Creation. In the beginning was the. .Word. .Fireball. .Flaring Forth. ..Big Bang. . .Void.”

“How do you feel knowing you were part of the origin of the universe 13.8 billion years ago? Can you feel, as Hildegard of Bingen said, a new sense of being ‘wrapped in the arms of the mystery of God,’ or of realizing anew what it means to say along with Hildegard that, ‘It is love which was the source of this creation. .The whole creation was formed through love. . Love was in eternity and brought forth, in the beginning of all holiness, all creatures, without any admixture of evil. Can you truly understand what Julian of Norwhich said when she declared, “We are loved from before the beginning. What difference does this understanding make in your life?  What wounds does it begin to heal?”

“O Spirit, Teach me anew and in the context of a new universe story what it means that all of creation, myself included, was “loved from before the beginning.” Teach us what it means in giving new life and meaning to our struggling species today.” Teach us what it means to see each person on the street as being loved from the beginning and how our own actions have led to their brokenness and that it is in our actions that we can bring back healing  love to them . Amen.

Silent Meditation

See Who You Are. Become Who You See!

WALKING STATION 2. “I am the Light of the World.”

“How am I the “light of the world”? How am I not? How can I allow more light to shine? How is the culture I am part of a ‘a light of the world’? How not? How can I improve?” How am light to homeless and disenfranchised people? How am light to those we pass today?

“O Spirit, Teach us how to be a light to the world and to link up with other lights to enlighten our species in these trying times (of inadequate housing, homelessness, and disenfranchisement)?”

Silent Meditation

See Who You Are. Become Who You See!

————————————————————————————-

Fr. River Damien Sims, D.Min., D.S.T.

P.O. Box 642656

San Francisco, CA 94164

http://www.temenos.org

415-305-2124

Can You Come?

March 7, 2019

Subject: Can you come?

 

Friend,

I’m attending an event called California Youth Climate Strike: San Francisco.

Join San Francisco youth as we strike for the Green New Deal and other necessary actions to solve the climate crisis. If you are unable to join us, consider organizing a strike, walkout, or other action on your campus! Learn more about our movement at youthclimatestrikeus.org
We, the youth of America, are striking because decades of inaction has left us with just 11 years (or less) to solve the climate crisis. We are striking because the necessary action to achieve the common-sense and vital goal of fighting climate change is not being prioritized. We are striking because marginalized communities across our nation �especially indigenous, black, and low income communities� are already disproportionately impacted by climate change, yet, few people in positions of power have acknowledged this reality, and even fewer have begun to confront it appropriately.
We are at a turning point in history. Our futures are at stake. We call for radical legislative action to combat climate change and its countless detrimental effects on the American people. We are striking for the Green New Deal, a fair and just transition to decarbonize the US economy, and other legislative action that combats the effects of climate change. We stand in solidarity with Greta Thunberg and all youth strikers worldwide as we demand action on this issue.
We are running out of time, and we won’t be silent any longer. We, the youth of America, are striking because our present and future on this planet are at stake.
And we are determined to do something about it.

Can you join me? Click here for details and to RSVP: https://actionnetwork.org/events/california-youth-climate-strike-san-francisco?source=email&

Thanks!

Fr. River

A Lenten Prayer

March 6, 2019

A Lenten Prayer

By taking the sign of ashes on our forehead, we also choose to take on an external identification with the poor of the world. We belong to them and they to us.

The Lenten season begins. It is a time to be with you, God, a time to pray, to fast, and thus to follow you on your way to Jerusalem, to Golgotha, and to the final victory over death. It is a time for us to see sin not as little individual acts but as our acts of disregard for the hungry, the poor and disenfranchised, people of other religions, races, and creeds.

I am still so divided. I truly want to follow you, but I also want to follow my own desires and lend an ear to the voices that speak about prestige, success, pleasure, power, and influence. To the voices that causes us to turn away from the person on the street, who are in our faces hungry and un housed, to the voices of the vast majority of people throughout the world who are hungry, have very little and live in squalor.  Help me to choose the narrow road of service through self sacrifice and the giving of myself to others. To give of my money, my goods, and live simply, so that others might live. I know that Lent is going to be a very hard time for me. The choice for your way has to be made every moment of my life. I have to choose thoughts that are your thoughts, words that are your words, and actions that are your actions. There are not times or places without choices. And I know how deeply I resist choosing you. I resist following you every time I turn my eyes away from people in need, every time I limit who I talk to because they do not believe what I believe, support the candidate I do not support, and hang out with the people I do not hang out with. I deeply resist choosing you when I depend on social media as a way of interaction, giving out my opinion, preaching my stuff, without interacting in person. I become the judge, the one who knows it all, and in so doing hurt others deeply.

Please, Lord, be with me at every moment and in every place. Give me the strength and the courage to live this season faithfully, so that, when Easter comes, I will be able to taste with joy the new life that you have prepared for me. Amen.

(Adaptation of Prayer by Henri Nouwen)

Each week we will give a selection of the Tenderloin Stations of the Cosmic Christ, our Good Friday Service this year. We invite you to pray, to mediate, and if you want to have a discussion email us at punkpriest1@gmail.com or call at 415-305-2124 or Snap Chat at Riodamien2.  We invite you to join us on Good Friday as we walk through the Tenderloin and if you would like to have a part please let us know.

Tenderloin Stations of the Cosmic Christ—2019

The Legend of the Sparrow

“Before I formed you in the womb I knew you, before you were born I dedicated you, a prophet to the nations I appointed you.”

There was a sparrow who dreamed to fly into the sun.

Oh, how the birds of earth set up a cry at such imprudence in a little one

when even eagles dared not venture near

the burning stratosphere.

“She will come down within a mile or two”,

they prophesied with dread.

It was of course, most pitifully true.

Scarce half-way up the mountain over head

she crashed her feathers, as they said.

But when her wings healed, up she shot again

and sought further bough.

She was more humble and more cautious now,

after a brief novitiate of pain.

Three times she rose; twice the wind brought her down,

once her own weariness

At last she clutched a  branch in her distress

and cried, “How can I ever hope to rest

in the sun’s downy nest?

I faint; I fall whatever way I go!”

But then she turned and saw the home she left

unnumbered miles below,

while just beyond her lay the mountain top,

a kerchief head of snow.

Nobody told her and she never guessed

the earth’s last height was all that she need seek.

All winds blow upward from the mountain peak

and there the sun has such magnetic rays

that in one moment she was lifted up

into his tender blaze.

Down in the valley there was such a stir.

A sparrow reached the sun!

Why had the wind and weather favored her?

What had she ever done?

Yet since they must, they spoke the praising word,

measured her flight and paused to gasp afresh.

What was she really but a little bird,

all feathered and no flesh?

Only the sun knew and the moving air

the miracle thereof:

a bird that wings itself with resolute love

can travel anywhere. Jessica Powers

Today is Good Friday, and we come to remember Jesus on the cross. We are going to be following the “Stations of the Cosmic Christ” which will lead us into a broader understanding of the crucifixion.

Our meditations are meant to be suggestive, in deepening the awesomeness of our thoughts, prayers, questions, and imaginations and  journeying towards  a deeper relationship with the Cosmic Christ, who shines forth in the image of God, the light of divinity, and the spark of divinity within each one of us.

This is our eighteenth Stations of the Cross. During these years we have seen the crisis of homelessness grow. We see people who are around us live without hope of housing, health care, and food. They sleep on the streets, our doorways,  parks, and  anywhere they can lay a blanket or simply sit down.

In each we see the image of the Cosmic Christ. And in this twenty first century we still hear the words of 17th century St. Tikhon of Zadonsk which ring true today:

“No longer should our brothers and sisters be seen wandering the roads and in the squares, starving and trembling with the cold, under the icy north wind, naked members of the body of Christ. There ought to be beggars and destitute persons no longer. All should be equal.”

Silent Meditation

See Who You Are. Become Who You See!

WALKING STATION 1–Creation. In the beginning was the. .Word. .Fireball. .Flaring Forth. ..Big Bang. . .Void.”  Kevin Frederick

“How do you feel knowing you were part of the origin of the universe 13.8 billion years ago? Can you feel, as Hildegard of Bingen said, a new sense of being ‘wrapped in the arms of the mystery of God,’ or of realizing anew what it means to say along with Hildegard that, ‘It is love which was the source of this creation. .The whole creation was formed through love. . Love was in eternity and brought forth, in the beginning of all holiness, all creatures, without any admixture of evil. Can you truly understand what Julian of Norwhich said when she declared, “We are loved from before the beginning. What difference does this understanding make in your life?  What wounds does it begin to heal?”

“O Spirit, Teach me anew and in the context of a new universe story what it means that all of creation, myself included, was “loved from before the beginning.” Teach us what it means in giving new life and meaning to our struggling species today.” Teach us what it means to see each person on the street as being loved from the beginning and how our own actions have led to their brokenness and that it is in our actions that we can bring back healing  love to them . Amen.

Silent Meditation

See Who You Are. Become Who You See!

An Ocean of Gentleness

March 2, 2019

An Ocean of Gentleness

. .The Lord’s faithful love is from forever ago, to forever from now for those who honor him. Ps. 103:17

“People were bringing children to Jesus so that he would bless them. . .”:Don’t forbid them because the reign of God belongs to people like these children.

“Love, open on me–for I am very tiny-the viscera of Your love and kindness. Pour on me the cataracts of Your gracious fatherly nurturing. Break  over me fountains of unlimited mercy. Absorb me in the depths of Your love. Drown me in the flood of your living love, like a drop loses itself in the ocean’s fullness. Let me die in the tsunami of Your immense compassion, as a little spark of fire fizzles in the streams surging current. Let the raindrops of Your kind love make me cling to you.” St. Gertrude the Great.

In The Daily Prayer for All Seasons, there is a prayer located in the morning prayer of Ordinary Time which reads:

“Holy One, we are too often blinded by trivial matters. Lord may our attention be diverted now from these things, and may we become as little children, trusting and seeking with love to cross bridges that we have not crossed in the past.”

Our streets are full of homeless, mentally ill, and people who can not afford a place to live.  Drug use is up all over the country in every walk of life. We live in our own “tribes” and our way of living is the only way.

It is in our living in our protective tribes that we set up the majority of people in the world to suffer in physical needs, psychological needs, and spiritual.  For example I have health insurance, and all that goes with it. My friends on the street do not have that privilege, or the privilege of seeing a therapist, or the privilege of food and a place to live every day. We live in our tribes are are afraid to reach out, and give of ourselves.

For example I was told in the past week that I was “eccentric” and “unconventional”.  Maybe in the eyes of the person who told me that, because I live my life differently from his. But as I look at myself I see that I have a good education which I use to its very best in service, and for nearly twenty five years have served my “tribe”‘ I travel, I go to movies, the symphony and the opera, I hang out with the rich, the poor, the middle class, and I live simply, but in a nice room, have nice clothes–so really how eccentric is that, how “unconventional is that.”

The story of Dives and the rich man is a story of tribes. The rich man finds it impossible to cross into Dive’s  world and lets him suffer, not out of meanness, simply out of the  fear of entering his world. He finds himself in the hell of his own tribe.

As we move into Lent, let us turn our eyes to Jesus, and see how prayer without action is meaningless,  and action can be simply praying for someone and giving money to help others, action can be simply sitting with someone who is in pain, and action can be simply to stop labeling people, stop judging people, until we take the log out of our own eye.

Becoming like children is to look at the world with wonder, to love people without labels, and with out guile, and wanting something in return.

This Lent I am trying to move into the ocean of gentleness until I drown, until all if see is God in that gentleness. I want to die in “the tsunami of Your immense compassion.” I encourage you to join me.

“Drown me in the flood of your living love, like a drop loses itself in the ocean’s fullness. Let me die in the tsunami of Your immense compassion, as a little spark of fire fizzles in the streams surging current. Let the raindrops of Your kind love make me cling to you.””

Fr, River Sims, sfw, D.Min., D.S.T.,

P.O. Box 642656

San Francisco, CA 94164

www,temenos.org

415-305-2124